Chocolate Bundt Cake

A very good chocolate cake is an elusive thing. In fact, even a half-decent chocolate cake is deceptively difficult. I find that the main issues with chocolate cake are that it is either too dry, or that is lacks a depth of flavour – and herein lies the conundrum. The more cocoa powder you add to a chocolate cake, the drier it gets, as the cocoa menacingly absorbs any liquid in the batter. This can be remedied by using varying forms and proportions of both fats and liquid in the cake – some recipes use oil rather than butter, some use hot water, some use yoghurt or sour cream – but even this can be temperamental.

This recipe is so exceptionally good because it manages to not only yield a moist chocolate cake but also one that is in bundt form (bundt cakes, incidentally, are also often rather dry due to their depth). I can’t take any credit for it – it’s written by the fantastic team at delicious. magazine – but I can say that it worked extremely well made gluten free, using (as always) Doves Farm gluten free flour and xantham gum.

Strangely enough, this cake is much better the day after it is made – it becomes denser and damper – but I don’t insist that you wait that long to try it!

Tempting for both humans and furry friends…
  • 200g unsalted butter, softened, plus extra for greasing the pan
  • 300g plain flour (I used Doves Farm GF plain flour + 1 tsp xantham gum)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 100g dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids), roughly chopped
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 160ml soured cream
  • 55g cocoa powder
  • 400g caster sugar
  • 3 large free-range eggs, at room temperature
  • 150ml double cream
  • 70g dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids), finely chopped
  1. Preheat the oven to 170°C/fan150°C/gas 31/2. Make a quick lining paste by combining equal parts of soft butter, vegetable oil and flour until you get a smooth paste. Use this to generously grease the inside of a 2.4 litre bundt tin (I used a Nordic Ware one) using a pastry brush to get right into the corners of the tin. Don’t rush this stage – you need to take care and be really thorough, otherwise the cake won’t turn out of the tin.
  2. Sift the flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt into a large bowl.
  3. Melt the chocolate in a bowl over a pan of simmering water, making sure the bottom of the bowl doesn’t touch the water. Once melted, take off the heat and sift in the cocoa powder. Add the vanilla extract, soured cream and 80ml boiling water, then stir to a smooth, thick paste.
  4. In another large bowl, using an electric whisk, cream together the butter and sugar until pale and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, whisking well after each addition, then stir in the chocolate paste until well combined – but don’t over-mix. Fold in the flour mixture, using a metal spoon.
  5. Dollop the mixture into the greased bundt tin and smooth the top. Bake for 45 min or until a skewer inserted in the centre comes out clean. Leave the cake cool and firm up in the tin for 15 minutes, then carefully turn the cake out on to a wire rack and leave to cool.
  6. To make the ganache topping, heat the cream in a small saucepan until it just comes to a simmer, then remove from the heat and add the chopped chocolate. Leave for one minute so the hot cream has a chance to start melting the chocolate, then stir until the chocolate has fully melted and the mixture is smooth. You can pour this all over the cooled bundt, or drizzle it within the ridges, and leave to set.

Lemon Bars

I have long been fascinated by lemon bars, and they’ve been on my ‘must bake’ bucket list for some time now. They are a quintessentially American treat, and something that I have heard lots about – mostly from American literature and TV shows – but they’re rarely seen or tasted in the UK.

Researching what looked like a reliable recipe for these was something of a challenge; it seems the variations on lemon bars are endless (some have a thin pastry, whilst others boast a thick shortbread base; some feature a no-bake, chilled curd, some a baked lemon custard), and every American cooking icon has their own beloved version, from Pioneer Woman to Ina Garten to the team at Bon Appétit.

For those of you who have never tried a lemon bar, the best way to describe them is probably as a slightly more robust tarte au citron, in traybake form. The base here is thin and melt in the mouth, with a sharp-sweet lemon curd-like topping. In short: they’re extremely delicious.

The recipe is largely based on one by the great Alice Medrich, but I’ve tweaked it ever so slightly to make it gluten-free and UK-measurement friendly. A copious dusting of icing sugar to finish is, of course, non-negotiable.

Ingredients

For the crust:

100g unsalted butter, melted

30g caster sugar

1 tsp vanilla extract

1/4 tsp salt

125g flour (I used Doves Farm gluten free plain flour + 1/2 tsp xantham gum)

For the topping:

250g caster sugar

25g plain flour

3 large, free-range eggs

Grated zest of 3 lemons, preferably unwaxed

Juice of 2 large lemons

Icing sugar, for dusting

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Grease a 8 x 8 inch square metal baking tray and then line it with baking paper so that it overhangs (this will make it easier it lift the bars out of the tray).
  2. To make the crust, combine the sugar, vanilla, salt and melted butter in a medium bowl. Add the flour (and xantham gum, if using) and mix until incorporated, and you have a nice, soft dough. Press the dough evenly over the bottom of the tin, then bake for about 25 minutes until the crust is well browned at the edges and golden brown in the centre. When the crust is done, remove it from the oven and turn the oven temperature down to 150°C.
  3. Whilst the crust is baking, make the topping. In a medium bowl, whisk together the sugar and flour to combine. Next, whisk in the eggs until blended, followed by the lemon zest and juice.
  4. When the base is cooked, remove it from the oven and carefully pour the lemon mixture onto the warm crust, then return the tin to the 150°C oven. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes longer, until the topping is puffed at the edge and no longer jiggles in the centre. Transfer the tin to a cooling rack and let it cool completely. Once cooled, I like to transfer the tin to the fridge for an hour or so for the filling to firm up completely.
  5. Once completely cool, lift the baking paper liner out of the tin and transfer the bars to a cutting board. If the surface is covered with a thin layer of moist foam (not unusual), you can blot it gently with a paper towel (although if you’re covering the bars with icing sugar, this isn’t really necessary). Using a sharp knife, cut into bars and then dust liberally with icing sugar just before serving.
  6. The bars can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to three days.